The Latest

mudwerks:

(via Carmen Dell’Orefice 1947 | © Pleasurephoto)
Sep 18, 2014 / 27 notes
oldrags:

Signorina Concha de Ossa
by Giovanni Boldini, 1888 Italy
Sep 18, 2014 / 136 notes

oldrags:

Signorina Concha de Ossa

by Giovanni Boldini, 1888 Italy

(via ohdarlingdankeschoen)

whitehotel:

Yuko Nishimura, Organic (2007)
Sep 18, 2014 / 62 notes

whitehotel:

Yuko Nishimura, Organic (2007)

(via workman)

fleurdelysbr:

"Graze Kelly"
Sep 18, 2014 / 1 note

fleurdelysbr:

"Graze Kelly"

Sep 18, 2014 / 85 notes
design-is-fine:

Russel Wright, iced tea glass, 1950s. Via Cooper Hewitt.
Sep 18, 2014 / 120 notes

design-is-fine:

Russel Wright, iced tea glass, 1950s. Via Cooper Hewitt.

(via bettiwettiwoo)

Sep 18, 2014 / 22 141 notes

(via entesublime)

archaicwonder:

Charon’s Obol: How ancients paid the ferryman!
Charon’s obol (aka danake) is the coin placed in or on the mouth of a dead person before burial. Greek and Latin literary sources explain it as a payment or a bribe for Charon, the ferryman who conveyed souls across the River Styx, which divided the world of the living from the world of the dead.
More precious gold or silver coins were seldom buried with the deceased so a type of “ghost money” was made instead by making an impression of a real coin into thin gold foil. These types of pseudo-coins were too flimsy to use as currency. This particular gold piece (c. 5th-1st century BC) was obviously modeled from the bee drachms from Ephesos (or Arados). Actual coins were also buried with the dead as well, though they were generally small denominations.
Two more examples of Charon’s Obols can be seen here and here.
Sep 18, 2014 / 553 notes

archaicwonder:

Charon’s Obol: How ancients paid the ferryman!

Charon’s obol (aka danake) is the coin placed in or on the mouth of a dead person before burial. Greek and Latin literary sources explain it as a payment or a bribe for Charon, the ferryman who conveyed souls across the River Styx, which divided the world of the living from the world of the dead.

More precious gold or silver coins were seldom buried with the deceased so a type of “ghost money” was made instead by making an impression of a real coin into thin gold foil. These types of pseudo-coins were too flimsy to use as currency. This particular gold piece (c. 5th-1st century BC) was obviously modeled from the bee drachms from Ephesos (or Arados). Actual coins were also buried with the dead as well, though they were generally small denominations.

Two more examples of Charon’s Obols can be seen here and here.

(via workman)

l-grvnt:

✖️
Sep 18, 2014 / 96 notes

l-grvnt:

✖️

(via brother-b)

Sep 18, 2014 / 4 296 notes
creativehouses:

Extra Storage
Sep 18, 2014 / 810 notes

creativehouses:

Extra Storage

(via leefchief)

cabbagerose:

sharifi-ha house, iran/nextoffice - alireza taghaboni
Sep 18, 2014 / 3 047 notes

cabbagerose:

sharifi-ha house, iran/nextoffice - alireza taghaboni

Sep 18, 2014 / 21 070 notes

(via hnchl)

dalatdesigns:

Clever way to design around in situ fixtures via JAKUBOWSKI.
Sep 18, 2014 / 6 notes

dalatdesigns:

Clever way to design around in situ fixtures via JAKUBOWSKI.

(via ureadybee)

Sep 18, 2014 / 6 243 notes